?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Day Eight: Flåm
sword
tiger_spot
Flåm is very picturesque, by which I mean you should look at the pictures and not bother going.



Flåm is very pretty and very small. It is far inland, at the end of one of the longest fjords in Norway. The walls of the mountains on the sides are heavily forested, except where they are so steep that nothing at all can grow on them. It is very pretty and very uninviting.





Andrés and I decided not to take the achingly picturesque train ride up the mountain and back on grounds that it cost 310 kroner (about $62) each. Instead, we thought we'd stroll over to Aurland (the next town) and see if there was anything interesting there. The path along the edge of the fjord was pleasant, separated from the road by a nice verge occasionally decorated with large versions of petroglyphs done in bushes.



About halfway there, the path ran out. We climbed up the hill a bit to see the exhibition of farmhouses (boring; possibly the tour would have been interesting, but it was expensive), then further up looking for the alternative path Andrés had spotted on the map. But the road ran out! We were very confused. On the way back down, we discovered the problem -- the path marked on the map was not a road, or a footpath, or even really a trail, but rather a very sketchy little goat track which we didn't feel it was prudent to walk down. So we turned around and went back down the mountain, past the paddock with white, black, and medium gray sheep (They baaed at us. Andrés baaed back. Someone took it personally....), to the path back to the ship for lunch (free!).



After lunch we hiked up to a waterfall. It was pretty, but the path was very steep and muddy, and the view of the waterfall from the top was about the same as the view from the bottom.



The view of the town from up there was nice, though.



When we got back to town, we looked into the Flåmsbana Museum. The Flåmsbana is the sightseeing train that goes up the mountain to Myrdal (population 1) through many complicated tunnels and impressive engineering and then comes right back down again because there's really not much point to it. Although Andrés and I hadn't ridden the train, the museum was still mildly interesting (and free).

The show on the ship after dinner was the big production number, City of Dreams. They'd meant to put it on the previous day, at sea, but there were too many waves. The dancers were good, and the aerial choreography (including a slo-mo kung-fu battle on wires) was neat, but the musical choices were strange. They had these city themes for the sets and costumes in each part of the show (Atlantis, Bombay, Beijing, and Venice), but completely ignored them when picking the music. It ranged from show tunes (Anything Goes from Guys and Dolls and Masquerade from The Phantom of the Opera) to popular music to some song from The Fifth Element.
Tags: ,

  • 1
It is very picturesque, though. The pictures make me think that I want to visit, even though I know it's illusion.

Also, now that I've happened to go and look -- I knew you'd said it was pretty far inland, but it's practically in the middle of Norway. Which is not exactly what I was expecting of the sorts of "pretty far inland" that one can get cruise ships to....

Fjords are odd.

  • 1